Financing for equity

1. Overall Education Financing Mechanisms

2. Policies and Programmes to Provide Resources to Schools

3. Education Policies and Programmes to Provide Resources to Sudents and Families

4. Social Policies and Programmes to Provide Resources to Students and their Families

 

  1. Overall Education Financing Mechanisms

In Syria, basic education (grades 1-9) is mandatory and all public basic and secondary education are free. Public higher education is also free; however, fees may be charged. Private institutions do not receive government financial support. In 2016, there were 1.9 million pupils in grades 1-4,  1.6 million pupils in grades 5-9, and 380,000 students in general secondary education. The MoE is responsible for all pre-tertiary education.

Syria allocated 5.1 percent of its gross domestic product (GDP; SYP 5.7 billion in 2016) to education in 2009. The Ministry of Education approved budget in 2020 is  SYP 32.59 billion (US $ 43 million) and the Ministry of Higher Education’s budget is SYP 29.14 billion (US$41 million). The total budget assigned for the major sectors (including transportation, energy and others)  and announced by official media outlets reaches 2,600 billion SYP (3.5 billion USD) out of the Syrian budget bill which amounts to 4,000 billion SYP (5.33 billion USD).

The years of conflict have left over 2.8 million children out-of-school. Of these, about 2.0 million school-age children live as refugees in countries including Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt. Over 36% of school-age Syrian children are estimated to be out of school inside and outside Syria. In 2018, in Turkey, the Ministry of National Education enrolled the largest number of Syrian school-age children to date, with more than 645,000 children in formal education. Similarly, one in four schools have been either damaged, destroyed, or used as shelter and for military purposes. The estimated direct cost of replacing damaged, destroyed or occupied schools, lost school equipment and training replacement teachers are US $3.2 billion in 2014. 

Launched in 2012, the No Lost Generation initiative is a project led by UNICEF and World Vision in support of children and youth affected by the crisis. It gathers UN agencies, international NGOs, local organizations and donors. One of its component focuses on education in Syria. In 2018, a total of US$ 113 million were disbursed to the program. The program’s objectives are to ensure children and youth have access to certified quality education.

 

  1. Policies and Programmes to Provide Resources to Schools

Enrolment

Under the No Lost Generation, 4.1 million children (in the country and outside of the country) enrolled in school in 2017/2018, up from 3.7 million in 2016/2017.

School feeding

School-feeding and/or take-home entitlements in Syria and the region reached more than 1 million students in 2018.

Refugee children

Trough the No Lost Generation Initiative, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) operates 103 schools which educate more than 50,000 Palestinian refugee children across Syria. It provides basic education to 49,682 Palestine refugee children in Syria.   Concerning funding in 2017, the UNRWA received US $ 141.7 million through the Syria Emergency Appeal, US $ 48 million under the Programme Budget (for core programmes and activities), and US $ 17.4 million through project funds and support to UNRWA programmes. Total budget in 2017 was US $ 207.1 million.

 

  1. Education Policies and Programmes to Provide Resources to Students and Families

There is no publicly available information on this topic.

 

  1. Social Policies and Programmes to Provide Resources to Students and their Families

There is no publicly available information on this topic.

Last modified:

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 17:21