NON-STATE ACTORS IN EDUCATION

1. Terminology

2. Typology of provision

2.1 State education provision 

2.2 Non-state education provision 

2.3 Other types of schools 

3. Governance and regulations

3.1 Regulations by distinct levels of education

3.2 Multi-level regulations 

3.3 Supplementary private tutoring 

 

  1. Terminology

Slovenia defines non-state actors (NSAs) in education in the general education law (Organisation and Financing School Act (1996) (ZOFVI)) and specific education laws (Kindergarten Act (1996), Basic School Act (1996), Higher Education Act (1993)). In these laws, the definition of NSAs is limited to zasebno šolstvo (individual and institutional private education providers). The Article 5 of the ZOFVI (1996) states that “The activity of education shall be pursued at public and private kindergartens and schools. […] Private persons providing education may pursue the activity of education at a kindergarten or school, or independently.” The Article 6 states that (pre)school education may also be provided as home instructions, but only in cases specified by law. In Higher Education Act (1993), private providers are only indirectly defined. The Article 72a states that funding from the budget of the Republic of Slovenia shall be provided for private higher education institutions for concessionary study programmes. The Article 61 states that higher education institutions may entrust the provision of individual parts of a subject or subject area to a private higher education teacher. Other NSAs are not specifically defined in general and specific educational laws, as well the umbrella term NSAs is not used in these and other national policy documents.

 

  1. Typology of provision

2.1 State education provision

State schools

In Slovenia, primary education is organised as integrated primary and lower secondary education, i.e. as a single structure nine-year basic school (9 years beginning at age 6). In line with the Constitution of the Republic of Slovenia (1991), education is financed from public funds and is compulsory. Providers of primary school education are mostly public, there is only less than 1% of registered private primary schools in the country.

The upper secondary education is not mandatory, also financed from public funds and mostly publicly provided (less than 1% of registered private secondary schools). It is categorized into general upper secondary schools (gimnazija) and technical (srednje strokovno izobraževanje) or vocational (srednje ali nižje poklicno izobraževanje) upper secondary schools.

Non-state managed, state schools

No information was found.

Non-state funded, state schools

No information was found.

 

2.2 Non-state education provision

Independent, non-state schools

There is a very small proportion of schools that are owned by non-state actors and financed typically through private funds. Those schools are primary and upper secondary international schools that implement internationally accredited programmes (3 primary to upper secondary schools) and primary schools that are based on special pedagogical principles, but do not implement a public school programme. Since, the latter are not officially registered and reported, it is hard to determine the exact number of those primary schools. All private schools that are financed typically through private funds, are located primarily in large cities.

State-funded (government-aided), non-state schools

All registered private primary and secondary schools are of religious orientation (e.g. catholic) or are based on special pedagogical principles (Waldorf, Montessori, Education for Life). Those schools are owned and managed by non-state actors and receive funding (direct payments per pupil) from the government. ZOFVI (1996) (Art. 86-91) stipulates that private schools are eligible to receive funds allocated by the state or local community, in case they implement the public school programme. The implementation of the public school programme, together with the extended part of the programme (supplementary classes, additional classes, morning care etc.) in private schools is financed by the state in 85% share (teacher salaries and some material costs, e.g. textbooks). The rest of the programme is financed through tuition.

Private schools are not eligible for state funds for investments, maintenance and equipment, but may participate in public tenders for such school resources. Private schools may also develop their own programmes, but they must comply with the goals of the public education system and enable pupils to achieve educational standards that are at least equal to those of public schools.

Contracted, non-state schools

No information was found.

 

2.3 Other types of schools

Homeschooling

In Slovenia, parents have the right to decide to educate their child at home during compulsory education, namely in primary and secondary education. The knowledge of the pupil is assessed and examined at the end of each school year. If the assessment committee ascertains that the pupil does not meet the required knowledge standards, he/she must continue education in school from the next school year (The Basic School Act (1996), Art. 88-92). In Slovenia, in 2020/2021, 687 pupils were home-educated. In school-year 2019/2020 there were 392 pupils that were home-educated. It is assumed that the increase in home-schooled children is in majority related to the consequences of Covid-19 regulations and changes in schools.

 

Market contracted (Voucher schools)

No information was found.

Unregistered/Unrecognised schools

No information was found.

 

  1. Governance and regulations

The education system in Slovenia is centralized and regulated by the Ministry of Education, Science and Sport. Respective national agencies in the field of education are responsible for monitoring and supervising public and private providers of education. There is no specific department or agency established for governing private/non-state actors. The founders of public and private kindergartens and primary schools are municipalities, which must partly finance their operation.

Vision: The White Paper on Education (2011) indicates the following proposals for further development of private education in Slovenia: one class is minimum to establish the private school instead of the current two; protection of public network of schools; inclusion of upper-secondary vocational education in the field of private education; recognition of the international associations of schools, which operates on the special pedagogical principles; strengthening the monitoring of private education; programs of private schools that teach in a foreign language cannot gain public validity.

 

The Resolution on National programme of higher education (2011) indicates the following directions in further development of private higher education:

  • The state will cover the costs of studying for study at public higher education institutions, but also at institutions.
  • Only those study programs of private higher education institutions that are not implemented in public institutions will be financed or co-financed from public funds, and the need for them in Slovenia and quality implementation has been demonstrated.
  • A framework will be created to facilitate the diversification of sources of funding for higher education. Conditions will be established for the development of donations as an increasingly important private source of funding for higher education.

3.1 Regulations by distinct levels of education
 

Preschool education is aimed at children aged eleven months to six years or until children start compulsory primary education. It is not compulsory. Preschool education is provided by public and private kindergartens. A public network of kindergartens may be complemented by private holders of a concession. Preschool education may also be organized at a home of a preschool teacher and a preschool teacher assistant employed at a kindergarten, or a home of a private preschool teacher.

In the school year 2018/19, children pursued preschool education in 1,165 administrative units of kindergartens. They were set up in 108 independent public kindergartens, 203 school-based kindergartens and 96 private kindergartens. There were 5,313 classes in total. The vast majority of children (94.4%) attended public kindergartens.

Entry/Establishment

Registration and approval: A private kindergarten can be established by a domestic and foreign legal or natural person. When a kindergarten, as a legal entity, is entered in the court register, it must obtain a decision from the Ministry of Education, Science and Sport on entering it in the register of providers of publicly valid programs before starting its activities. Childcare services may also be provided by childminders. They too, register with the Ministry of education to provide individual in­home care. Childminders may organise care at their homes, but for not more than six children. The number of registered home­based child­minders continues to rise, among others, because of scarce places in public kindergartens. In June 2019, there were 319 registered child­minders. For more information, see Multi-level regulations.

Licence: See Multi-level regulations.

Financial operation

Profit-making: See Multi-level regulations.

Taxes and subsidies: Private kindergartens shall be eligible to receive funds from the municipal budget if they implement at least a half-day programme; they employ or otherwise engage preschool teachers and preschool teacher assistants to implement the programme in accordance with the Act and other regulations, and; they are accessible to all children; and if at least one class of preschool children is admitted. The basis for calculating the municipal obligation for an individual child attending a private kindergarten shall be the price of a public preschool programme of the same type in the territory of the municipality reduced by the amount that the parents would pay had the child been admitted to the public kindergarten. The private kindergarten shall be eligible for 85% of such funds for an individual child. The funds for co-financing the parental fees shall be provided from the state budget directly to private kindergartens (Kindergarten Act (1996), Art. 34).

Quality of teaching and learning

Curriculum and education standards: The indication of the program for pre-school children that is implemented by the private kindergarten must be evident from the Act on the establishment of the kindergarten. The founder of a kindergarten may decide to implement the Curriculum for Kindergartens, which was adopted by the Expert Council of the Republic of Slovenia for General Education in March 1999. The founder may also decide to implement his program or program according to special pedagogical principles. If the letter is implemented, it must be submitted and approved by the Expert Council of the Republic of Slovenia for General Education for consideration. If a private kindergarten implements the program according to special pedagogical principles, it must demonstrate that the program has been approved by an international association (Kindergarten Act, Art. 13).

Teaching profession: In private kindergartens that are eligible for funds from the municipal budget, the workload of preschool teachers and preschool teacher assistants, the regulation of employment relationships and the determination of employees’ salaries shall be determined in accordance with the acts and implementing regulations applicable to staff in public kindergartens (Kindergarten Act (1996), Art. 35). Private preschool teachers shall meet the same requirements as preschool teachers, preschool teacher assistants or counsellors at public kindergartens and they shall register with the Ministry of education. Childminders do not need to teach Kindergarten curriculum (1999), but have to be qualified to take care of children. For more information, see Multi-level regulations.

Equitable access

Fee-setting: Private kindergartens, which provide public service (public kindergarten, a private kindergarten with a concession and a private kindergarten financed from the municipal budget), should define the price of the programme according to the Rules on the methodology for the formation of prices for pre-school institutions providing public service (2003). If more than one child from the same family is admitted to an officially recognised programme of a private kindergarten, the parents shall be entitled to co-financing from the state budget for younger children in the amount of the payment that they would have been liable for had the child been included in a kindergarten providing a public service preschool programme in the territory of the municipality where the private kindergarten has its registered office (Kindergarten Act (1996), Art. 34).

Admission selection and processes: No information was found.

Policies for vulnerable groups: Parents receiving financial social assistance under social assistance regulations shall be exempted from payment also in private kindergartens which are eligible for public funds (Kindergarten Act (1996), Art. 32).

Quality assurance, monitoring and accountability

Accountability requirements: No information was found.

Inspection: Implementation of the provisions of the Kindergarten Act shall be supervised by an inspector responsible for education, excluding supervision of the norms and standards pertaining to the premises and equipment of kindergartens, which, insofar as they pertain to sanitary health conditions, shall be carried out by the health inspector, and the supervision referred to the regulation of employment relationships in private kindergartens, which shall be carried out by the inspector responsible for labour, and supervision of determining the wages of employees in private kindergartens, which shall be carried out by the inspector responsible for wages in the public sector (Kindergarten Act (1996), Art. 52). The inspector responsible for education may, without prior notice and without permission, enter the premises of the childminder during the care of pre-school children, in order to supervise the childminder of the fulfilling the prescribed conditions regarding norms and standards for space and equipment, number of children and persons providing care (Kindergarten Act (1996), Art. 52a). For more information, see Multi-level regulations.

Child assessments: No information was found.

Sanctions: The Kindergarten Act (1996) (Art. 53) defines various sanctions for public and private kindergartens as well as childminders in the case of violating the Act. They include financial fees for institutions and legal representatives ranging from 1,000 to 10,000 euros as well other sanctions, which can result also in deletion from the register of pre-school providers. For more information, see Multi-level regulations.

Entry/Establishment

Registration and approval: Private education providers, implementing officially recognized programme(s), shall submit their request to be entered in the register to the educational administration body of the area of their permanent residence. A private provider who pursues educational activity independently shall be issued a decision on the entry in the register – in view of norms and standards as specified by the Minister – which shall specify as well the maximum number of children, pupils, upper secondary school students or higher vocational college students or adults that the provider may enrol at the same time, namely subject to field, scope and method of pursuing educational activity, and in view of spatial conditions. It should fulfil the requirements set in Rules on norms and standards for the implementation of the primary school programme (2007) and infrastructure requirements defined in the Instructions for the construction of primary schools in the Republic of Slovenia (2007). There is no fee of the registration process. The Minister determines the format of the register and the procedure for entry and removal from the register (ZOFVI (1996), Art 38). These procedures are defined in the Rules on the Management of the List of Operators of the State-Recognized Educational Programmes (2009). For more information, see Multi-level regulations.

Licence: The content and the procedure of adopting education programmes of private schools shall be decided with the founding act. The education programme shall become officially recognised once the respective Council of Experts has established the compliance of the programme with the goals of the education system in the Republic of Slovenia and guarantee of an equivalent educational qualification standard. An education programme pursued at a private school according to special pedagogical principles (Steiner, Decroly, Montessori, and alike) shall become officially recognised when the respective Council of Experts has established that the programme complies with the goals of the education system in the Republic of Slovenia and guarantees the minimum knowledge required to successfully complete education, and that it had been recognised by the relevant international association (ZOFVI (1996), Art. 17, 25). For more information, see Multi-level regulations.

Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH): No information was found.

Financial operation

Profit-making: See Multi-level regulations.

Taxes and subsidies: In order to protect the public network of schools, notwithstanding the provisions of ZOFVI (1996) Art. 86, a private school shall not be entitled to public funds if the enrolment in a private primary school jeopardises the existence of the only public primary school in the same school district. In such case, a private school financed from public funds shall cease to receive funds after a final decision is issued by the Minister (ZOFVI (1996), Art 87).

Quality of teaching and learning

Curriculum and education standards: A private school shall determine the primary school programme in accordance with its acts. A primary school shall offer classes in the following compulsory subjects: Slovenian (and Italian or Hungarian in ethnically mixed areas), mathematics, a first foreign language, history, homeland and civic culture and ethics, sports, at least one natural sciences subject and one social sciences subject, and at least one subject in the field of the arts. Private schools that offer the primary school programme according to special pedagogical principles (Steiner, Decroly, Montessori, etc.) may design a primary school programme, regardless of the above provision, in accordance with these principles, though in such a way as to ensure the knowledge requirements that shall enable the completion of basic education (Basic School Act (1996), Art. 28).

The programme of a private primary school shall, in subjects listed above, ensure attaining at least an equivalent educational standard for pupils as ensured by the programme of public primary school (Basic School Act (1996), Art 30).

The respective public institution (National Education Institute) shall monitor the enactment of any new education programme according to the previous paragraph throughout the schooling of the first generation (ZOFVI (1996), Art. 17).

Textbooks and learning materials: For compulsory subjects specified by law, listed above, the private schools (and all schools that implement officially recognised programmes) shall use textbooks approved by the respective Council of Experts (ZOFVI (1996), Art. 21).

Teaching profession: See Multi-level regulations.

Corporal punishment: Corporal punishment is unlawful in schools. The 2017 Organization and Financing of Education Act prohibits corporal punishment of children in all educational institutions.

Other safety measures and COVID-19: Private schools providing officially recognised education programmes and private kindergartens providing programmes for pre-school children shall fulfil the requirements prescribed for education staff, facilities and equipment at public kindergartens or schools. Private kindergartens and schools providing programmes according to special pedagogical principles shall fulfil the requirements prescribed for the facilities of public kindergartens or schools (ZOFVI (1996), Art. 33).

Equitable access

Fee-setting: For a pupil or student who is not above the upper limit of the material status for granting a state scholarship, the tuition fee can amount to a maximum of 15% of the funds that the state provides to the public school for salaries and material costs per pupil or student (ZOFVI (1996), Art. 88).

Admission selection and processes: No information was found.

Policies for vulnerable groups: No other information was found.

Quality assurance, monitoring and accountability

School board: No information was found.

Reporting requirements: No information was found.

School inspection: Private schools that receive public funding are subjected to the same inspections as public schools. For more information, see Multi-level regulations.

Student assessments: The national examinations are provided in public and private schools. For pupils of private schools and schools that implement the primary school programme according to special pedagogical principles, the third subject in the national examinations shall be the first foreign language (Basic School Act (1996), Art. 64). For primary school pupils educated in private primary schools, school certificates shall be issued with marks as defined by the private school programme. A private primary school shall issue school leaving certificates with marks as determined by the programme (Basic School Act (1996), Art. 83).

Diplomas and degrees: Private education providers, implementing officially recognized programmes, can deliver diplomas, degrees or certificates that are officially recognized.

Sanctions on school closures: If a pupil wishes to transfer from a private school to a state school, the state school in the school district in which the pupil resides shall be obliged to accept him (Basic School Act (1996), Art .48). The State shall ensure the completion of the education of children of a private school that discontinues providing the officially recognised programme due to the termination of public financing (ZOFVI (1996), Art. 91). Based on the identified irregularities in inspection process, the inspector among other measures can a) inform the founder of the school about the identified irregularities and about the necessary measures for their elimination, b) temporary prohibit activities or c) propose to the competent Ministry the deletion of the kindergarten or school from the register of providers of publicly valid programs (School Inspection Act, 2005). For more information, see Multi-level regulations.

Higher education is organized at public and private universities and independent higher education institutions. In the 2018/2019 academic year, over 65.500 students pursued studies at faculties, art academies and higher education professional institutions. The number of higher education institutions has increased markedly in the last decade. In 2018/2019, there were three public and three private universities, one independent public higher education institution and 48 private higher education institutions, 28 public and 20 private higher vocational colleges in Slovenia.

Entry/Establishment

Registration and approval: The operation of private higher education institutions are regulated by the same legal framework as the operation of public higher education institutions (including the establishment of institutions and study programmes), which ensure comparable quality standards and the possibility for both types of institutions to operate (Higher Education Act (1993); Resolution on National Programme on Higher Education) (2011).

Licence: The requirements for accreditations, defined in Criteria for the accreditation and external evaluation of higher education institutions and study programmes (2017), are the same for public and private institutions. Initial accreditation of a higher education institution is granted for a period of five years. Re-accreditation of a higher education institutions is granted for a period of maximum of five years (or less). Accreditation of a study programme is granted for an indefinite period.

Financial operation

Profit-making: There is no information found on the prohibition of profit-making. However, the Higher Education Act (1993) (Art. 120, 175) defines that the disclosed surplus of concessionary higher education institutions may be used for the performance and development of its main activities.

Taxes and subsidies: In addition to the Criteria for the accreditation and external evaluation of higher education institutions and study programmes, which are the same for public and private institutions, Funding from the budget of the Republic of Slovenia shall be provided to private higher education institutions for concessionary study programmes for:

  • the academic activity of full-time study in the first and second cycles (the academic activity)
  • the study-related extracurricular activities of students, as defined in the annual programme of the student council (Higher Education Act (1993), Art. 72)

Funds for the extracurricular activities shall be determined annually by an order of the minister responsible for higher education, taking into account the number of enrolled students and the value of funds in the financial plan of the ministry responsible for higher education for this purpose (Higher Education Act (1993), 72j).

Private concessionaires are not eligible for funding of investments and maintenance; however, they may apply for the part-financing of development projects through special calls for tender. Such funding is also available to private higher education institutions without a concession.

Most private vocational colleges are financed by private funds, that is, fees. Such schools have the status of private institutions and as such make their own decisions in regards to their financing. The law poses only the following restrictions:

  • minimal staff requirements to start providing services,
  • programme accreditation,
  • consent from the Council of Experts for education staff (licence), and
  • entry in the register of schools at the ministry of education.

Higher vocational colleges which are financed by school fees provide only part-time study. Fees are lower than the programme cost per student that would apply to full-time study. Students commonly pay in instalments. All part-time students who are not employed or do not have the status of an unemployed person are entitled to receive study support under the same criteria as full-time students.

Quality of teaching and learning

Curriculum and education standards: Study programmes of private higher education institutions shall be accredited in accordance with the Criteria for the accreditation and external evaluation of higher education institutions and study programmes (2017).

Teaching profession: A higher education may entrust the provision of individual parts of a subject area to a private higher education teacher. A private higher education teacher is a person who has been elected to the title of higher education and is listed in the register of private higher education teachers kept by the ministry responsible for higher education (Higher Education Act (1993), Art. 61).

Equitable access

Fee-setting: Rules on tuition fees and other contributions in higher education (1994, Art. 2) defines that citizens of the Republic of Slovenia pay tuition fees for full-time study in undergraduate study programs not conducted as a public service, part-time study according to undergraduate study programs, for postgraduate study programs, and for in-service study programs. Citizens of the Republic of Slovenia do not pay tuition fees for full-time study according to undergraduate study programs conducted as a public service, except for that part which exceeds the standards set by the national higher education program. Foreigners and Slovenes without Slovene citizenship who are studying at higher education institutions in the Republic of Slovenia pay tuition fees in accordance with the regulations governing the study of foreigners. The Rules (Art. 5) define the methodology for calculating the tuition fees and define the elements, which could be taken into calculation.

Admission selection and processes: No information was found.

Quality assurance, monitoring and accountability

Board: The composition of the administrative board of a private higher education institution shall be laid down by the memorandum of association and statutes (Higher Education Act (1993), Art. 23).

Reporting requirements: The Concessionaire is obliged to report on its financial operations at the request of the Grantor (Higher Education Act (1993), Art. 175).

Inspection: Quality assurance procedures in the field of higher education in Slovenia are performed by the National Agency for Quality in Higher Education in accordance with the Criteria for the accreditation and external evaluation of higher education institutions and study programmes (2017). The procedures are valid for public and private providers of higher education.

Assessment: The same as for public higher education institutions. The Higher Education Act (1993) (Art. 66) states that the statutes of a higher education institution shall lay down detailed rules and procedures, particularly regarding: the academic calendar, admission procedures, examination procedures, promotion, including conditions for faster promotion, completion of education, transfers between study programmes, repeating a year and conditional promotion, resuming studies after a period of interruption, parallel, interdisciplinary and individual studies, recognition of examinations and other study requirements fulfilled at other higher education institutions (Higher Education Act, 1993, Art. 66). Article 6 states universities and independent higher education institutions established by the Republic of Slovenia shall operate according to the principles of autonomy, which shall primarily ensure them, among others, the determination of study regimes, and the determination of the forms and periods of testing the knowledge of students. It is evident in the practice that each higher education institution has rules on the examination and assessment of knowledge adopted.

Diplomas and degrees: The Higher Education Act (1993) (Art. 32a) states that anyone completing all obligations under an educational study programme shall obtain an officially recognised educational qualification and shall receive a diploma, which shall be a public document. The contents and form of diplomas shall be determined by the competent body of the higher education institution and shall be published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia. The "Diploma Supplement" shall form a constituent part of the diploma. Higher education institutions shall issue them in Slovenian and in one of the other official languages of the European Union. The elements of the form shall be determined by the minister responsible for higher education on the proposal of the Slovenian Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. Diplomas and "Diploma Supplements" shall be free of charge. Anyone completing all obligations under a supplementary study programme or under part of an educational study programme shall obtain a certificate, which shall be a public document. Insofar as the study programme is provided by an international association of universities, it shall be marked on the diploma or certificate that the study programme was provided in the framework of an international association of universities.

Sanctions on institutional closures: No information was found.

3.2 Multi-level regulations

The general provisions for establishing and operating private kindergartens and primary and secondary schools are defined in ZOFVI (1996). Besides that, there are also some specific provisions that are defined for pre-school education (in Kindergarten Act (1996)) and primary school education (Basic school Act, 1996) that are described in the sections above. This section entails general provisions relevant for both – pre-school and primary education. There are no specific provisions defined for non-state provision of upper secondary education in General Upper Secondary School Act (1996) and Vocational Education Act (2006). Private higher education in Slovenia is regulated separately in Higher Education Act (1993).

Entry/Establishment

Registration and approval: To be entered in the Register of providers of publicly valid education programs, a private kindergarten or school must meet the following conditions:

The name of a private kindergarten or school shall indicate that the kindergarten or school is private (ZOFVI, Art 69). The content and shape of stamps of private kindergartens and schools shall be determined in their founding act (ZOFVI, Art. 70). Schools that implement officially recognised programmes shall issue official documents on forms defined by the Minister (ZOFVI (1996), Art. 71).

Financial operation

Profit-making: A kindergarten or school, financed from public funds, may not perform educational activities for the purpose of making a profit (ZOFVI (1996), Art. 7).

Quality of teaching and learning

Teaching profession: The requirements applying to the education staff of public kindergartens and schools shall also be met by the education staff of private kindergartens and schools implementing officially recognised programmes. The provision shall not apply to kindergartens and schools implementing programmes for pre-school children or education programmes according to special pedagogical principles (ZOFVI (1996), Art. 104).

Both public and private kindergartens and schools shall ensure that their education staff is adequately qualified, that is they have a perfect command of Slovenian (and/or the language of the relevant ethnic minority); hold a relevant educational qualification and they have passed the professional examination.

Private provider of (pre-school) education shall:

  • Fulfil the requirements for pre-school teachers, teachers, counsellors or other education staff
  • at public schools;
  • Have a perfect command of the Slovenian language;
  • Not be in a full-time employment relationship;
  • Be a permanent resident of the Republic of Slovenia (or be a citizen of EU member state);
  • Not be prohibited from pursuing activities by a final decision, and;
  • Be entered in the register kept by the Ministry responsible for education (ZOFVI (1996), Art. 36, 37).

The salaries and other personal income of staff at a private kindergarten or school financed from public funds shall be set in accordance with the law, the collective labour agreement and other regulations in force for public schools. If salaries and other personal income are set in violation of this provision, financing from the state budget shall be terminated (ZOFVI (1996), Art. 89).

Quality assurance, monitoring and accountability

Inspection: The school inspectorate supervises the regularity or legality of management and education activities at public and private institutions. It carries out regular and extraordinary inspections and examines legal, organisational and other administrative procedures.

Sanctions: Kindergarten or school is deleted from the register if the publicly valid program ceases to be implemented; if it is prohibited from implementing a publicly valid program by a final judgment; and if it does not comply with the final inspection decision, which refers to the provision of the conditions necessary for entry in the register (ZOFVI (1996), Art. 35).

 

3.3 Supplementary private tutoring

Private tutoring is increasingly widespread in primary and secondary education in Slovenia, although there is no official data on the amount of the increase, content and the prevalence of the service. The most common forms of private tutoring are individual tutoring hours provided outside school by teachers or tutors from tutoring companies. The latter is established through the Companies Act and are not regulated through the education regulation. These are private companies that check the qualifications of their tutors with exams (not regulated by the state), covering the subject they wish to tutor. Anyone can establish such a company and hire tutors, and anyone with proper knowledge and skills can apply for tutoring. The prices of tuition are also unregulated and depend on the offer and competition in the market.

Entry/Establishment

No additional information was found.

Financial operation and quality

No additional information was found.

Teaching profession

No additional information was found.

 

 

This profile was drafted by the Network of Education Policy Centers (NEPC).

 

Última modificación:

Mar, 07/12/2021 - 15:36